Friday, February 1, 2019

It's A Girl Thing - Turner Syndrome Awareness Blog Hop

Hello Blogging Friends!!

We are happy you are here!


Turner Syndrome is a genetic disorder where a female is born with only one X chromosome, instead of two, leaving her with life-long medical issues and learning disabilities. This condition occurs one in 2,500 female births worldwide, but is more common among pregnancies that do not survive to full term. That is why Turner Syndrome Females are considered MIRACLES!







Nineteen caring Sponsors have partnered with us to bring Turner Syndrome Awareness to the Public. 


Eleven talented and caring designers are offering prizes on their personal blogs as well:


Each designer was asked to use a few of the official TS colors in their creations:




Because we have 42 DT members who want to support this awareness event, prizes will be awarded based on very easy criteria. Commenters will become eligible to win prizes. The more comments hoppers make, the more opportunities you have for winning. Here's what to do:

HOW TO WIN:

  1. Leave a comment on the TS Awareness Home Blog Post stating at least one thing you learned about Turner Syndrome. Our Tab titled About Turner Syndrome has a quick pictorial explanation of many of the symptoms or limitations faced by TS females.
  2. Leave a comment on one or more DT blog hop posts. 
  3. Prizes will be awarded randomly from the comments left on 19 of the DT blog hop posts + by 11 of the designers who are awarding prizes of their own. So the more posts you visit and comment on, the more likely you are to win a prize. Don't forget! You must also leave one comment on the Home Blog, too.
  4. We hope this will bring an awareness not only about Turner Syndrome in females, but that if any human being seems a bit out of the ordinary, there could be a health-related or genetic reason for it, and it would be nice to give everyone the benefit of the doubt in our daily lives.
Winners will be announced on February 15, 2019.


Let's get started! Click on a thumbnail photo below to leave a comment about their TS related creation. Then come back to this page for the next person in the blog hop line up. The design team thanks you for supporting and learning About Turner Syndrome


106 comments:

  1. Thanks for hostessing this hop Lori. I've learned so much about Turner Syndrome. Surprised that age 9+ tends to be the diagnosis age but some aren't diagnosed until adulthood. Off to hop, the gallery is gorgeous.

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  2. Thanks so much for organizing this wonderful hop, Lori, Donna and Darlene!! I'm so honored and excited to participate and help bring awareness to Turner Syndrome!! I can't wait to see all of the amazing creations in support of the cause :)

    Lisa
    A Mermaid's Crafts

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  3. Thank you for holding this blog hop. I don't recall hearing about this syndrome before. So that it exists is new to me. But I also learned that a mathematical learning disability is found in 50% of those with the syndrome. Wow.

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  4. It's amazing the number of functions our estrogens accomplish! I did not realize the far-reaching developmental ramifications from lack of the hormones, including early onset osteoporosis, menopause, bodily growth, and many other functions! Lori, thank you for allowing me to take the awareness journey with you! love, de
    {Creative Smiles - my little crafting world}

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  5. So glad to be a part of this hop Lori. I've learnt loads about Turner Syndrome while writing my post. That image with all the growth hormone shots really gets me! I was surprised by how many have really late diagnosis too. The tummy troubles, heart defects, learning problems, infertility and that's just a fraction of ways that the girls can be affected. So much still to learn for me personally, but also for the medical profession. I hope they make some research breakthroughs soon. Hugs, Wends xoxo

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  6. Thank you for hosting an awareness blog hop. I learned that there is a Turners Syndrome and will be doing more research to educate myself, thank you again!

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  7. I am delighted to be a part of the hop Lori. As a retired physiotherapist Turner's syndrome is a condition I learnt about in my medical studies. What I have learnt though through the hop is how many people are unaware of this condition so I really hope this hop does its part to promote awareness. Hugs xx

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  8. I guess the first ...and maybe the most important thing... is that Turner Syndr9me exists. I had no idea until today. Than’ you for sharing this information and for hosting the blog hop

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  9. I am pleased to say I read not only the info on TS but also your story and journey with Julie. The one fact that I am going to say that stuck out to me was the decreased incident in breast cancer in TS patients. But your concern over giving HRT because of the risk of breast cancer was and had to be an extremely excruciating one to make. I am the co-owner of The Rabbit Hole Designs and would be proud to help support you in your next TS Awareness HOP..

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  10. First, thank you for this Turner Syndrome awareness blog hop. As for what I learned...A LOT because I was unaware of its existence. I am going to read more about it and "educate" myself.

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  11. Awesome cause! And great job putting all this together! I learned a lot because I had not heard of this Syndrome - it's so wonderful that you are bringing so much awareness to this! God Bless you!

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  12. I accidentally found out about the genetic disorder, Turner Syndrome, today while looking at greeting cards on social media. Thank you for bringing this to our awareness and for organizing the blog hop. Hopefully, soon, science will have a way to correct the missing X chromosome. I plan on going through the blog hop and learning more about Turner Syndrome. Blessings to you!

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  13. So I just finished HOP-ing thru all the beautiful projects and will come back to hit those that were not up yet or for some reason I could not access (could totally be operator undercaffeinated error on my part) and I just want to say each project was beautiful in it's own way and the outpouring of support was felt throughout each and every stop. You could see those that participated put forth real effort in their projects for this Awareness Hop they all I am sure felt honored to be a part of.

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  14. I just finished the blog hop, what a beautiful project from all......
    Hopefully all the links will be working the next day.
    I felt honored to be a part of your bloghop. Thanks for having me.
    bye Ine

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  15. Lori, I'm absolutely honoured to be part of this hop! My scant knowledge about Turner Syndrome has definitely increased! Thank you for sharing just how 'real' this issues are facing these 'miracles'!
    ~carol

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  16. I never heard of Turner's syndrome, thank you for sharing and bringing awareness to this cause. I hope that continued awareness will bring more solutions and comfort to 80,000 girls and women in the US facing the challenges of this syndrome.

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  17. I had not heard of Turner Syndrome. I learned about it today because of your hop. And yes every person living wirh this syndrome is truly a miracle! And they have a special purpose they are here for. We need to love others because of who they are and not because they fit a mould society has deemed one should be like.

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  18. I had never heard of Turner Syndrome and am so glad you have made us all aware of this disorder. Let's spread the word and let others know!

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  19. I was totally unaware of the existence of TS before this blog hop was advertised, I'm sure I'm not the only one. You are doing a great service to the girls/ladies with this condition in bringing it to peoples' notice. I read the info pages and Julie's story, thank you for sharing it. Hopefully if more is known and understood about TS it will help in diagnosing it earlier than the present average of 9+ years!

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  20. Thanks so much for organising this awareness blog hop! I confess that I'm not aware of Turner syndrome existence! Nevertheless, I have learned alot about this disorder via this blog hop! The facts lesser risk of breast cancer, increasing moles by age, mathematical disorder in 50% of TS, teeth problems, kidney malfunctions, tummy troubles, not diagnosed until adult hood were stuck in my heart! Thank you so much for making us all aware of this disorder!

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  21. This has been quite an education, Lori. Like many others, I was totally unaware that Turner Syndrome existed. The one fact that surprises me the most is how many females with the condition reach adulthood before the condition is detected, with the average time being 9 years. I'm surprised there is not a test for diagnosing it at birth. Thank you for bringing awareness via the blog hop. You, Donna and Darlene have done a fantastic job!

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  22. What a great blog hop and worthy cause! I learned a lot about Turner Syndrome - it's amazing how many other disease and disabilities those with TS are more susceptible too. Thanks for making us aware of this.

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  23. Bless you Lori, for bringing all this info to all of us I had no idea of all the difficulties of the Turner syndrome. Thanks to all of you who helped setting up the hop you gals are just amzing!! I am looking forward to seeing all the designs.
    DL.ART
    DIANA L.

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  24. Beautiful Hop Lori and beautiful cards by everyone...I am just starting my hopping now and look forward to seeing all of the designs up close!! Thanks for bringing this to our attention, as what I learned was everything as I had no idea this even existed and it seems there are lots of us that didn't know...give that beautiful daughter of yours a BIG hug from me....and one to yourself as well!! Awesome job of getting this off the ground!!!!
    Diane {Nellies Nest}

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  25. Turner syndrome kids are likely to have CHD's (congenital heart defects).

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  26. what a great cause. Thanks for bringing this to our attention - I didn't know that Turner females had only one chromosome!!

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  27. Thank you for this wonderful hop ..I have studied about this syndrome during my graduation but was not aware that it exists too ..I knew it's a girl thing and one in 2500 women affected by this. Hugsxx

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  28. Firstly, was not aware of TS. After reading and doing research. It is amazing, how few women know about TS. For me it affects in pregnancies. Also leading to heart disease. I have Heart Disease and I did not know TS is also on the list. Thank you for alerting me and now to help make other aware.
    Hugs

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  29. I have never heard of this syndrome before so was quite shocked to learn that it's in 1 of 2500 females! There's a lot of females on this Earth so it seems like a very high ratio! What a beautiful way to get the message out there by having this hop.

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  30. I actually have heard of this syndrome since it is talked about in the coursework for chiropractic college. I didn't remember how common it was though. This is such a great blog hop to help bring awareness regarding this condition.

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  31. I have been aware of Turners Syndrome through a course that my husband teaches but wasn't aware of how common it is. The high rate of Turner Syndrome births that do not go full term make it seem rarer than it actually is. Thank you to the crafters and sponsors who are helping with Turner Syndrome awareness.

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  32. I'd never heard of Turner Syndrome before I found this blog hop, thank you for raising awareness. As a retired teacher I was interested to learn that 50% of sufferers have a mathematics learning disorder. xx

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  33. Thanks for sharing these informations (I had never heard about this health issue, before now) and thanks for organizing this wonderful hop!

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  34. Congratulations on putting together such a creative and educational blog hop! I did not know that chromosomal mosaicism was more common in women with Turner Syndrome.

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  35. What a creative way to learn about TS. I was surprised to learn how many girls are diagnosed with it and how it affects their lives. Great job Lori getting us all the info we needed to participate. Hope the cards raise money for these lovely girls.

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  36. As a nurse I knew about TS but I didn’t know about some of the less disabling aspects like large hands and feet. I also didn’t know that so many other health conditions are related or that amazingly they can have different genetics in different cells. That’s so fascinating.

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  37. I had not heard of TS but have learned much reading the info here. I was amazed at how many babies and fetuses are affected!

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  38. Wow, I never heard of this disorder before. It amazes me how advanced our society is yet the average age of dx is 9 years or older. I can't imagine going through this type of pain without knowing what is causing it. I hope this brings the disorder to the forefront so that it may help others to be dx earlier and help them deal with and understand it.

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  39. WOW! I never knew! Thank you for doing this! Estrogen does everything! I did not realize ramifications from lack of the hormones, including early onset osteoporosis, menopause, body growth etc.... THANK YOU AGAIN!

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  40. Just finished the hop and don't see my comment.... First, BEAUTIFUL projects and creations... JUST WOW! It's nice to see the GENIUNE comments people have left about the designers cards and creations... slightly disappointed at some of the commenters who are just copying and pasting the same comment on all the blogs just to "win" this is a great cause and doesn't need to be tainted by that... hopefully they will be weeded out when the winners are drawn.
    I never heard of Turner's syndrome, thank you for sharing and bringing awareness to this cause. I can't believe it effects 80,000 girls and women in the US... jaw is on the floor!

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  41. I had never heard this Syndrome. This is absolutely new to me. Thank you so much for sharing this information.

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  42. Everything mentioned about Turner's syndrome was new to me since I never heard about it before, but your personal journey with your daughter made the disease more personal.

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  43. I agree with Jane's comment, that so many don't know TS even exists!! I know I didn't!! The late diagnosis' is a startling fact and so many problems arise like colorblindness, difficulty in math, kidney & dental probs... and on. My favorite part of they information post is all of the BEAUTIFUL people pictured there <3 Thanks for your information awareness efforts <3

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  44. This is the first time I heard about Turner's Syndrome, I am shocked to learn it had effects so many women, thanks for all the helpful information and thanks for raising awareness!

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  45. Didn't know anything
    about this. So learned
    a lot today.
    Carla from Utah

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  46. I knew a little about this syndrome but had no idea that the health impact could be so huge. I was really struck by all the beautiful girls and women who have this syndrome and are strong and capable.

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  47. I never heard about this syndrome, nice how you share on this blog so many problems and difficulties for those girls/women with the amazing lovely pictures! All those possible healthproblems, heart, kidney, ... problems at school with maths...
    Good idea this bloghop to let us learn about is!
    Nancy

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  48. Thank you, Lori, for educating us on Turner Syndrome and especially for sharing your story of your beautiful daughter, Julie. I'm familiar with several genetic disorders because I have a niece and nephew with Gaucher Disease, but have never heard of Turner Syndrome until now. That's really surprising because 80,000 is no small number. I was also surprised at how many different ways it can affect a girl's/woman's body. It amazes me that the lack of one chromosome can cause so many health and learning issues. You were very fortunate that Julie was diagnosed so early. Let's hope that through continued awareness and education that other girls will also be diagnosed at an earlier age and be able to use their wings!

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  49. Wow! What a complex disorder! I haven't heard of Turner's Syndrome until now and I am in awe of the number of health issues - high blood pressure, kidney issues, the osteoporosis, the spatial difficulties {this one I can relate to as I was born with no depth perception - I can't back up a car to save my life!} and so many more. Julie seems incredibly strong to deal with so much and you and your family are warriors! Thank goodness she was diagnosed young. Hugs to all of you!

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  50. Thank you for sharing your journey and spreading the knowledge and awareness of Turner's Syndrome Lori. I confess that I found out about this Blog Hop through a crafty friend who is participating and I am so glad that I came, as I am now learning about another genetic disease that does not have the high profile for research or community support that it deserves. I feel quite overwhelmed that there is such a broad variety of health issues associated and understand how it would be a challenge to make a diagnosis. It makes me wonder just how many young girls and their families are suffering needlessly because the symptoms are so broad and genetic testing is not routinely done. The image of just 10 months of growth hormone injections and the cost is a stark way of showing just one of the many ways the girl and her family are impacted.
    It sure has been a roller coaster ride for Julie, you and your family. I am glad that she had such an early diagnosis but my heart aches that much of the knowledge about Turner's Syndrome has actually been gathered through your experience and strength to battle to do the best you could for her. Be proud of yourselves are parents!
    Thinking of you and thanking you for sharing, I look forward to learning (and remembering) more as I hop along and will definitely be looking out for ways we can help in our local community.

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  51. You have such a huge good heart, this is another aweful genetic condition that doesn't get nearly enough publicity or research funding. Raising awareness like this is awesome & I must admit I'm learning lots about it. I never realised how many were effected & diagnosed so late in life at times. I'm off to hop but I'm also going to raise awareness by posting about this to non crafting friends ( yes odd I know non crafting !!!)

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  52. Thank you for setting up this blog hop. I had never heard of this syndrome before, so in my case it is certainly doing its job in terms of raining awareness.
    I can only imagine the obstacles living with this means you have to overcome on a daily basis, and I thought the list of different problems related to it was staggering!
    Sending all my best wishes to you, your daughter and all your loved ones.

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  53. Just wanted to commend you on a great job bring awareness to TS. I'm so happy I could help spread the word! Bless You!

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  54. Thank you for spreading the word and bringing awareness to terrible syndrome. I learned that many females are not diagnosed until they are adults. What a shame that is, too. I will keep them in my prayers.

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  55. Thanks for putting on this TS hop. I have never heard of this syndrome before today. I have learned so much! Amazing list of effects like diabetes, urinary system malformations and so many more! Thanks for sharing!

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  56. Thank you for sponsoring this awareness event. I teach elementary school and hadn't heard of TS before today. I appreciate the information and am enjoying the team's creations.

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  57. Thank you for sharing about TS. I never heard of it before and was shocked that it happens to 1 out of 2,500 female births. I look forward to hopping through your hop and seeing everyone’s Projects.

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  58. We have a friend who's daughter has TS. She is a 34 year old college educated woman who is amazing. While I knew that she had to have hormone injections, I had no idea all of the complications and related disorders that this could lead to. Thank you for sharing this information and letting me a part of the blog hop to inform others.

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  59. Thanks for enlightening me about Turner Syndrome. I had no idea that it affected so many females and that it also was a leading cause for other health conditions.

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  60. I appreciate the opportunity to learn about Turner syndrome and Klinefelders syndrome. I learned that if diagnosed early, Turner syndrome can be treated with hormones, but sadly cannot be cured. Very interesting.

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  61. Thank you for information! I have not heard of Turner Syndrome before today. I was shocked to read that 1 in 2500 female births are effected by TS.

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  62. Wow-I has never heard of this syndrome before.
    I was very surprised at many of the health issues, especially that these girls need to go on estrogen replacement hormones by the age of 11-12 yrs old. God bless you for bringing TS to our attention and God bless all of those angels affected by it.

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  63. Lori, Donna and Darlene - Thank you so much for all of your hard work and efforts at putting this together and bringing awareness to TS!! I am honored to be apart of this blog hop and wish you all the best!! HUGS

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    1. Thank you so much Vicki! Donna and Darlene are so awesome! I could have never pulled this off without them! They were both there for me every step of the way!!

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  64. In one out of every 2500 female births, the baby is born with only 1 female chromosome.

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  65. Thanks for a wonderful blog hop and sharing your story :)

    I have learned many things.
    One of them was the need for daily growth hormone.
    It reminded me of when my daughter was on it (started at 5). It also brought back memories of going to doctors and specialists concerned something was wrong but not getting many answers.
    We saw a geneticist who said possibly Russel Silver Syndrome, another Genetic Disorder, but she didn't have all the traits of that either so it was just a "maybe" diagnosis. She was put onto growth hormone anyway.
    Thanks for raising awareness of Turner Syndrome and genetic disorders in general.

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  66. I'd never heard of Turner Syndrome, so this is new to me. I learned that the condition occurs in one in 2,500 female births worldwide. Thanks for the awareness and putting together this hop!

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  67. I had no idea about Turner Syndrome until I read your post, so now learned that it occurs in one in 2,500 female births world wide. I cannot begin to imagine the devastation of this happening in extremely backward countries. This hop is so beneficial for this syndrome, and the posts are gorgeous! The colors are fabulous!

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  68. Thank you for doing this. We have experienced this syndrome first hand. My daughter was diagnosed with this at age 11. Now she is graduating from high school this May with honors. She has danced in many competition for her school. She has mild symptoms right. So proud of her. Thank you again for doing this.

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    1. Thanks for hopping along with us Alicia! How wonderful that your daughter is graduating with honors! That is wonderful! We were lucky that Julie didn't have any heart problems, but she does have some of the other symptoms along with learning disabilities. We have to get more research done on TS!! I am hoping this blog hop will get to the people who can initiate research!

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  69. Thank you for all of the info on TS. I did know a little about it but now I am more informed. Also Thank you for sharing your story and journey with Julie. Thank you for a wonderful hop.
    Have a wonderful day,
    Migdalia
    Crafting with Creative M

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  71. Wow! THank you for sharing this! I had never heard of Turner's Syndrome before. I did not know it only affects females and can cause short height and heart problems. I appreciate this information and thank everyone for the inspiration!

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  72. I didn't know anything about this. I learned that it is when a female is born with only one x chromosome.

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  73. Having a myriad of non-run-of-the-mill health issues means I am familiar with a lot, but I hadn't heard of Turner's Syrdrome before today. I liked learning that the butterfly being the symbol for Turner girls... plus I've read that butterflies can still fly with 70% of their wing missing, so these miracle gals like Julie that manage to rise despite 50% of their chromosome missing is quite fitting! Thanks for educating us on this!

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    1. ps... I'm also dannscraftingwhims... some of the bloggers use wordpress and my comments are under my wordpress blog name.

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  74. I thank you for this posting. I have never heard of Turner Syndrome and can not believe this as it is one in 2500 female births. I worked in special education before retiring and have never heard of this.

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  75. I had never heard about Turner Syndrome before reading your blog. I'm glad you are doing this to raise awareness. Thank you.

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  76. What an honour to be part of this hop, Lori and a great cause of creating awareness. I hope more people get to know about this and are gentler and kinder towards the girls with TS. I think your story also creates an awareness about getting the check up done during pregnancy as you said it can be screened. I wish a healthy and happy life to Julie and big hug to you.

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  77. I learned that girls and women with TS have a 2-3 times higher rate of fractures.
    slrdowney at hotmail dot com

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  78. I learned Turner Syndrome is a genetic disorder (I have not heard of this) where a female is born with only one X chromosome, which causes medical & learning disabilities. Thanks for the Hop.

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  79. We have talked about Turner over the years and I never realized how many symptoms there were. Thanks for making me even more aware. You are a wonderful advocate for Julie and trying to help future TS gals have the best life possible. Julie has opened my eyes over the years to learning how differences just make you special in your own way. Her smile, laughter and memory are amazing, always asking about my boys. You and Julie are an inspiration, as is your whole family with the love and dedication to Turners education.

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  80. Thank you for bringing attention to this genetic disorder and for raising awareness about Turner Syndrome!!! I've already heard about this syndrome but but I didn't know that the average age of diagnosis is 9+ y.o. and some aren't diagnosed until adulthood.

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  81. Wonderful hop Lori. Thank you for letting me know about Turner Syndrome. I had never heard of it before I met you. Thank you for letting me be part of your hop to raise awareness.

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  82. I didn't know anything about Turner Syndrome before this hop, so it has been truly an "awareness" hop for me. Each of the facts that were highlighted on the info page made me see just how much of a miracle a Turner syndrome gal really is!! Hugs to all involved.
    <3 J

    jwoolbright at gmail dot com
    HerPeacefulGarden.blogspot.com

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  83. I am a Speech Pathologist. Turner Syndrome sounded familiar to me as I saw the title of this blog hop. After reading the info you provided, I know why now. I learned about it in school because a sensorineural hearing loss is more common. I think this hop is a great way to raise awareness.

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  84. Thank you to the crafters and sponsors who are helping with Turner Syndrome awareness. This is a beautiful way to honor those who live with the Syndrome. Your awareness blog hop is my first introduction to Turner Syndrome. I have learned that TS can manifest in so many differing ways. Thank you for bring this to my awareness. BC--you may know of someone who is battling with health but not finding an answer.

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  85. Thanks for hosting this hop and giving us all an opportunity to learn about Turner Syndrome! I had never heard of it before, so I really learned a lot from all the information. It affects females, as many as up to 2500 girls a year! That's a lot! It also affects females who don't survive birth, so every girl born with Turner Syndrome is a miracle! I'm so glad you are a part of this hop!
    Take Care!
    Michele
    crimsonowl@comcast.net

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  86. Thanks so very much for organizing this wonderful hop dear Lori
    I just know aboout this case and thanks for telling us about it
    I will do to hop to all participant
    I try my best as much as I can
    many thanks Lori
    and biig hugs from Munich
    Monika

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  87. I've learned so much about Turner Syndrome, I haven't known for this syndrome before. I was quite surprised that girls are age 9+, when they set the diagnosis.
    hugs xx

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  88. We can never have to much compassion for others , so I too am glad to take part in this Hop with you . Before this hop I’d never heard of Turner Syndrome . Who knew one missing chromosome could be so harmful to ones life ? My youngest grown son Jordan has Autism so as a mother of a special needs child , your eyes are wide open for others struggles , especially late diagnosis and how it can cause major developmental set backs . My son wasn’t diagnosed with Aspergers ( a form of Autism) until the end of 7th grade and not for lack of trying on my part . This late diagnosis cost my son and I immeasurable grief and frustration , I hope the late diagnosis of Turners can be improved upon for these young Miracles . ❤️

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  89. Thank you so much for having us! What an honor to be a part of such a great cause! I appreciated the information your shared with us as well! It was something I was not aware of. Thank you.

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  90. I had never heard of Turner Syndrome and it's all new for me. I've learned so much about Turner Syndrome. Thanks for sharing information.

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  91. This is such a great blog hop to raise awareness for Turner Syndrome! I didn't knew this desease existed before! I learned a lot about it through your post and links - the picture of that little girl with all the hormone injections really got to me. And you are so right about how we need to give everyone the benefit of the doubt in our daily lives! You never know what someone might go through!

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  92. Never knew about Turner before I read this blog hop Thank you for making me aware of it

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  93. I had never heard of Turners Syndrome before. It is surprising to find out the impact it has on a young girl/woman's body - dental issues, diabetes risk, mental capacity for math to name a few. It seems that every system of the body is affected. By increasing awareness, I hope that more medical research can happen to help those girls with Turners Syndrome.

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  94. I just read about Turner's Syndrome yesterday. I had never heard of it and did not know it only affects girls. I love that the symbol is a butterfly. Thank you for this information and getting the word out about this syndrome.

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  95. Thank you for all of the information. I didn't know that a Turner's Syndrome girl could survive. I thought they were all stillborn. I had a niece that was stillborn

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  96. I just read about Turner Syndrome and upto now I never knew such a condition was there and it affected girls. Most of all I did not know that it was a genetic disorder. The symbol butterfly means freedom. Thank you for speading word and making us aware of this disorder. If I can be of any help to you'll please let me know. All the best in your endeavour. Greetings from sri Lanka.

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  97. I didn't know about this condition before seeing this. What a long challenge for you as parents when doctors are unclear...I have a cousin with something they don't know a lot about too. It is a daily issue. I have things that are not readily seen by looking at me. Even when you tell people they don't believe it is really a problem because they don't see you using a walker, in a chair, etc.

    Julie has a great smile and seems like a happy person with a good sense of humor. That is so valuable and something a lot of people don't have-they are just unhappy and mean all the time.

    All the best to you all.

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  99. Thanks so much for your blog hop. As my unborn great neice has been diagnosed with Turner Syndrome I have been learning about this syndrome. These girls are miracle babies! Blessings!

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  100. Thank you for the beautiful inspiration! And thank you for educating me about Turner Syndrome.

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  101. I was not aware of Turner Syndrome. One thing I learned is 50% of those with TS have a mathematics learning disorder.

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  102. Thank you for doing this! You are an Angel...

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  103. Hi i thanks to the Blog hop I learnt a lot about TS. I am planning to write an article in the local papers to create awareness. I am a journalist by profession but my first love is crafting. I got a gift for commenting on Donna Blog. It is my first gift . Thank you all. Tc stay blessed. Love and hugs from Sri Lanka

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